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NOT IN OUR
SCHOOLS.

KEEPING GENDER IDEOLOGY
OUT OF OUR SCHOOLS.

Under misguided good intentions, New Zealand schools are implementing gender-identity ideology into their curriculum, supported by the Ministry of Education’s Relationships and Sexuality Education guidelines.

We don't believe it is appropriate to teach impressionable children that they may be the opposite sex if they exhibit gender nonconforming behaviour. 

 

We work closely with Resist Gender Education, they specialise in providing advice and resources for parents, teachers and other interested parties.

You can find them here.

We also recommend this template for opting out of the gender identity component of RSE.

The main points to note when dealing with schools and school boards are:

Parents' voices are very powerful in NZ schools and they can stop gender identity theory from being taught in schools.

To achieve this, parents will need to be persistent.

Parents need to raise their concerns about gender identity theory with the school in a respectful and calm manner.

They need to become a 'polite nuisance' to make it very difficult for the principal and board of trustees to disregard their concerns. 

Parents need to be aware that although schools need to teach relationship and sexuality education, it is the Board of Trustees and the principal who determines what content is included in these lessons. The BOT needs to take into account the values of the school community in order to decide what content to include. 

Schools can teach compassion and acceptance of children and people who are gender non-conforming without teaching gender identity ideology.

Parents should be extremely concerned about the guidelines from MOE that suggest schools keep secrets from parents and should socially transition children without parental involvement. 

Social transition is a powerful psychosocial intervention that can determine the outcome for a gender questioning child. It is not a neutral act and should never be done without parental involvement and the guidance of a mental health professional.